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Reader Comments (53)

Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:13PM Anatidae said

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I was excited about this game, but when it came out I logged in, met a bunch of rude players, got bored of grinding and just felt more "Meh"

So I moved on.

I am sort of hoping they fix it somehow

Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:14PM wjowski said

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Is it me or do things like this make Free-To-Play look like less of an innovative new payment method more of a desperate last resort?

Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:15PM DevilSei said

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HAHAHAHAAH!!! HAHA!! AHh!! I'm running out of breath! Haha!!

Okay... give me a few minutes to catch my breath... haha...


Not surprised. Not surprised one little bit at all.

Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:15PM Atnor said

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crap, I just patched last night and was gonna check this game out again. Now I might be in more of a wait and see stance.

Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:17PM Cendres said

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This is sad in a way, I once followed this game closely and talked to some of the lead artists, really great people. Unfortunately for me the game did not pan out to where I liked it and it's unfortunate it didn't catch on. Then again there was a lot of just bad timing and loss of faith about the product from the community.

:s

Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:20PM (Unverified) said

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When will these companies learn to stop releasing their games as subscription to begin with. It's a dead model. If you want to compete, do box sales if you want (for those top titles), but subscription is dead. If you release a game today as subscription, you are a damn fool. Subscription MMO's only hit a small market of gamers, and if you want to get the rest of the gamers playing MMO's, going to have to ditch the subscription model. Players will do RMT, but they won't do subscription.

Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:23PM Keen and Graev said

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Lol, wait, what? Dead model? 11+ Million people for ONE subscription model game and millions more spread out across others is "dead"?

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Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:28PM (Unverified) said

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WoW DOES NOT have 11 million subscribers. Over half that is outside America and Europe, which is not subscription based. So we're left over with, say, 5 million subscribers. Of that, WoW has declining numbers.

Now let's add in that WoW hasn't been available in China for almost a month now, and suddenly their 11 million is reduced to six or seven.

Sorry Keen, but it stands, subscription is as dead a business model in gaming as CD sales is for music. Times are a changing, and you need to keep up with trends. Although you are well known for being wrong and out of touch.
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Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:34PM Zontix said

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Lol yea you're completely right, WoW doesn't have 10 million SUBSCRIBERS or anything, yea...subscription is dead, right.
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Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:43PM (Unverified) said

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Don't worry it's just that subscription plans are for us grown-ups. Rmt is for the people who are not intelligent enough to know that they end up paying more money for items than they would just paying a standard subscription plan.

You pay $30 for a mount and later spend $5 bucks for some potion. $10 for housing plan. A month later you pay $15 for some housing. And little did you realize you just spent the amount I would for 4 months worth of gaming. With the exception that I would have access to all in game items and features where you would have to continually buy them. But to each their own, right?!
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Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:57PM Kuriboh said

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You couldn't be more wrong. What are the biggest titles in Korea? AION, World of Warcraft, Lineage, Lineage 2 they are all subscription model games. How dead is the model just dominate the huge Korean market? And Korean is the birth place of free-to-play item mall model. Heheh.
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Posted: Jun 30th 2009 4:20PM Lethality said

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Wow Scythe, I'm the last one to agree with Keen but you have your head up your ass. The subscription model is solid, and WoW's numbers are increasing.

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Posted: Jun 30th 2009 4:54PM (Unverified) said

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Mark this post, come back in two or three years, and eat crow. Enjoy.

Guess MMO players are unaware of the gaming world outside of MMO's and how small WoW numbers are compared to other gaming. There are so many more who would play MMO's yet don't because they want to play more than one game, and dedicating yourself to one game (or two) is all subscriptions allow.

RMT allows you to play many games, like most gamers like to do. You don't have to decide, oh, I want to come back to the game for this month.

Fact is, not only I feel this way, but many in the games industry and many in the economic world. The writing is on the wall. You just have to do the looking. Perhaps some looking around is needed, and those numbers for subscription games pale in comparison to the numbers for non-subscription games (not just MMO's).
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Posted: Jun 30th 2009 10:23PM UnSub said

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@Gamestuffed: If I paid $60 over two months in a F2P title, I'm still ahead over the sub-paying player because they had to put down $50 - at least - for the box or digital download of a new MMO, then another $15 for the second month's sub.

For older MMOs, where they might charge less for the initial box, this changes the figures somewhat. But then in a F2P I might go six months without buying something and still have access to the title, whereas the sub player still has to pay to keep access to their account.

Both models have strengths and weaknesses, but let's be sensible in comparing them. Especially if you are going to criticise people's ability to do financial math.
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Posted: Jul 1st 2009 1:21AM (Unverified) said

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@ScytheNoire:

I can see your points about box sales being a possible way to go. Guild Wars certainly did pretty good that way. - It just seems to me that free-to-play games are always a lot simpler than subscription games.

Also - I think you have a few misunderstandings about WoW.
There are indeed 11 mio active accounts, and not necessarily subscriptions, as some of those accounts are held active through pre-paid game cards, but I do not understand your claim about non-US accounts specifically being non-subscriptions, as you can get the pre-paid game cards in the US as well... And I hesitate to call a pre-paid game card funded account a "non-subscription account".

I'm in the EU and both my acccounts are subscriptions.
We have exactly the same options you do.
Where did you get the idea that we didn't?
What exactly did you imagine that we did in order to play the game?
The subscription model is open to all WoW players, regardless of their region.
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Posted: Jul 1st 2009 2:25AM (Unverified) said

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I lump North America, Europe and Australia together, as they often have similar business models. Asian countries are another matter, as things don't work the same as they do here, their business model is different.

You will never see Blizzard claim subscriber numbers, but instead they'll use words like accounts or players. Similar thing with Free Realms and the way they worded their press releases, using accounts created, rather than active accounts.

Always look closely at those press releases, because the words are chosen carefully for a reason, because our perception of things is not reality.
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Posted: Jul 1st 2009 5:37AM (Unverified) said

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Very well said. The economy is still in recession and there are lots of games coming out soon bound for Free to Play model. There is nothing wrong with the model. That only depends on whose playing the game. It's like buying a car or any product in the market. Others want to have signature stuff, whereas you can also buy for a cheaper product that also serve its use.

In mmo we have different kinds of MMO but it just the same as any out there. Theres always a community, boss, PvP, PvE, etc. it all depends if you like the game you are playing.
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Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:26PM Aganazer said

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Very sad to see, but not a big surprise.

It had fantastic combat, great story lines, great atmosphere, and possibly the best death penalty system in the genre. Unfortunately it lacked in most other areas. The worst was the bad introduction to the game. Spawning in a newbie zone at PeP 0 (very slow) with a bunch of kill quests and not much story was probably a bad idea.

Its failure is bad for the genre. It proves that innovation is not rewarded (as if TR's closure wasn't enough of an indication). I guess we'll keep seeing more and more dumbed down mass appeal games and fewer niche innovative titles.

Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:41PM Greeen said

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sad to hear. discussion of payment models good or bad or future or not aside, it just shows how difficult the MMO market has become.
if you decide to play an MMO it is sort of a long-term interest and investement from the players, and if there is too much of the same to choose from.... and on top of that, if the MMO market still is substantially(?) smaller than "regular" single/multiplayer games, it is a tough investement for companies. Just shows that "innovation" doesn't always pay off. Hype and marketing do a lot, at least on the short run. Small companies can not even do that.

Posted: Jun 30th 2009 3:44PM Lateris said

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No offense to anyone but...Subscriptions are not a dead business and that is a dangerous notion to follow the trends into a downward spiral for any business in the MMORPG industry. Over 11 billion was generated in subscriptions last year. People tend to always follow the fools into stupid business decisions because they think free to play with micro transactions is a sure win. The fact is you keep the subscriptions and do the micro transactions. This enables a company to build a profit allowing generated revenue to be saved for rainy days like recessions. For pre productions game companies depend on publishers and investors when they should return to the small business model that is run out of the garage. I think long term survival needs to be reassessed for the industry. We don't have to be S. Korea.

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