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Reader Comments (11)

Posted: Jun 10th 2009 12:30PM HackJack said

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Historical materialism dominates all humans, all their constructs and all their beliefs. ALMOST all...

There is no escape :)

Posted: Jun 10th 2009 1:03PM J Brad Hicks said

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And once again, people on the Internet think that they're the first ones to discover something. And, having only just thought of it, they don't know a solution. And, once again, having only just thought of it themselves, and being sure that nobody else in any other situation has ever had this problem, they think that there must not be a solution. Dooom!

News flash: in the non-Internet economy, there are whole sub-industries of fraud control and prevention. Nobody likes having them; if we thought we could get away with not having them, we would, because they cost money to run and somebody has to pay for it. This is, in fact, exactly what the 30 year experiment with "financial deregulation" in the real world was ALL ABOUT.

RMT and botting and other scams in MMOs don't "prove" that online economies are impossible, any more than the dot-com bubble and the fraudulent mortgage CDO bubble "prove" that real economies are impossible. What they both prove is what happens when it's nobody's full-time job to keep the economy honest through monitoring, transparency, and enough enforcement that the vast majority of the people who might otherwise be tempted to scam are afraid of getting caught.

Honestly, this stuff is not difficult. People just think it is, because it went out of style after Reagan and Thatcher.

Posted: Jun 10th 2009 1:23PM LaughingTarget said

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The biggest problem, which we should learn well for the real world, is all currency in online worlds are based on pure fiat. Simply put, there isn't a limit to how much currency exists in the world. It eternally flows in, this by itself breaks the entire economy, as it broke the real world one.

That's the foundation problem, an unlimited source of money. Find a way to limit resources in a game world and the economy then can cull many of the problems like rampant inflation and gold sellers. Gold sellers can no longer just sit by and grind it away.

Posted: Jun 10th 2009 2:31PM (Unverified) said

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Great points! Oversight (expensive) and Limited Resources (moving target) are great solutions to most of these concerns.

One other suggestion I'd suggest, also inspired by the real world is to employ your players. Not directly of course, but make the things that make money be things that enhance game value for other players. If they're making the game better, adding content, options and etc -- f they bring value... why not let them cash out, especially if its done through the game, giving you oversight and perhaps even additional revenue.

Use the economy as a social engineering tool for your community and world.

Posted: Jun 10th 2009 4:58PM (Unverified) said

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I have been creating value-added content in Second Life for a couple of years mostly for the fun of it in the form of a concert series that is among the most well-attended regular events inworld. I never was looking to make money, but I wish I could find a way to raise the inworld costs and make my project independent--not dependent on the loan of space and resources. But the funding of the arts in the real world has no relationship to virtual arts and the virtual economy benefits from the rich content of artists but isn't really able to support them. http://music-island.blogspot.com

Posted: Jun 10th 2009 5:50PM (Unverified) said

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Well, being that I have a banker in every game I play. Regardless of an Auction House or a Personal Vendor, it is far easier to make fake currency than real currency. Until that change is made to be the opposite, it will always be better to make the game and sell it for real.

Posted: Jun 10th 2009 10:32PM (Unverified) said

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Reading this article, I'm left with only one real point: "Humans suck."

Posted: Jun 10th 2009 10:49PM Ergonomic Cat said

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Need more Vespene Gas!

Posted: Jun 11th 2009 8:38AM (Unverified) said

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Carefully covers 'empty' label on Vespene Gas Canister and tries to sell it to Derek K.
Reply

Posted: Jun 21st 2009 4:40PM (Unverified) said

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One other suggestion I'd suggest, also inspired by the real world is to employ your players. Not directly of course, but make the things that make money be things that enhance game value for other players. If they're making the game better, adding content, options and etc -- f they bring value... why not let them cash out, especially if its done through the game, giving you oversight and perhaps even additional revenue.

Use the economy as a social engineering tool for your community and world.

Posted: Jun 21st 2009 5:58PM (Unverified) said

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"I have been creating value-added content in Second Life for a couple of years mostly for the fun of it in the form of a concert series that is among the most well-attended regular events inworld. I never was looking to make money, but I wish I could find a way to raise the inworld costs and make my project independent--not dependent on the loan of space and resources."

Exactly Kate Miranda! You are working for free to others make money.


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