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Reader Comments (8)

Posted: Apr 6th 2009 5:04PM TheJackman said

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It does not say anything about the games release date other that the canceled tv show executive producer Brad Wright (not sure of he is ex. p of the new show SGU) does not hear any news or got a clue whats going on!!

Brad Wright does not have noting to do with the game so far I read he use to be in contact but now did not talk to the game designers for a few weeks/months.

Posted: Apr 6th 2009 6:05PM (Unverified) said

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If this game goes down the tubes anyone think there will be a revival by another company like star trek?

Posted: Apr 6th 2009 6:06PM OldBoy said

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It does say loads that since this interview appeared online (a week ago, at least), CME/Firesky haven't done anything to respond. And Brad Wright, no less than co-creator of the whole franchise, was on board as creative consultant for the game. If it were still in full swing, why wouldn't he have only good words to promote his cash cow?

Posted: Apr 6th 2009 8:18PM (Unverified) said

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As a long time fan of the Stargate universe I was really looking forward to this game until the troubles with its development began to leak out last fall. I would really appreciate it if Massively could try and get an official comment from the people over at Cheyenne. Perhaps even an interview to clear the air about the status of the game and what went down last fall.

Posted: Apr 6th 2009 11:25PM (Unverified) said

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Your not going to get an official reply, it would only validate or further expose the problems that CME/FireSky is having.

Brad Wright commenting is pretty much a telling of the likelihood of the game's chances. He's not just the guy who was a producer on the show(s) he's one of THE guys.

It'd be like Ron Moore saying that the next Battlestar product wasn't very good.
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Posted: Apr 6th 2009 10:19PM wjowski said

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What an utter waste of money and time. Brad McQuaid'd be proud.

Posted: Apr 6th 2009 11:44PM (Unverified) said

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Yeah I understand that but I bet there is a story here, even if it ultimately a tragic one. Seeing a game or development studio disintegrate is almost never a positive thing for the industry, but sometimes the retrospectives on such failures are illuminating, cautionary tales for others. Take for instance Bill Roper and Flagship. Jeff Green's interview of Roper for GFW was one of the best interviews I read last year, gaming related or otherwise, and I would encourage everyone to check it out on 1up.com

Posted: Apr 7th 2009 2:08AM Anatidae said

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I used to work in the game industry before I went back to the video/film industry. (obviously a CGI artist here) and I was always shocked at how much "testing" went on in a game company. "testing" is what was called playing some other game instead of making your own.

There might be some truth to testing out other games so you know your competition, but I remember it always just being an excuse not to work.

It seemed the trend in every game company I worked for or had friends that worked for is that you would have a few passionate artists pumping out lots of concept art that just looked really cool. If you were lucky you had one passionate programmer (your game might go live then) and then the last hopeful ingredient is that your producer had passion too. If too many artists/programmers preferred "testing" to making the in-house game... oh well. That was some writing on the wall. If your producer lacked leadership and the drive to keep everyone at task, your doomed. And the black art of programming. Well, if you lacked a sharp motivated developer (even one) your game will never see the light of day.

There are so many things that could have gone wrong with this team. Just one of the key roles manned by a lame duck could have been the anchor. From the various art samples, it seemed like they had at least a couple solid artists putting in the hard time. These days a graphic engine means nothing as you can license great ones for generating runtime play that will impress any investor. So it probably came down to the amount of server/client/logic code in place (or lack of). That or just sucky gameplay.

It sounds harsh, but for most failed games I saw it was the programmers who didn't pull their weight. Programming progress is hard to track by anyone other than another programmer. And even in this bad economic time, finding a good/experienced programmer is a hard task in just about every development language. It has been years since I directly left the game development side of things and I would assume that the black art of programming is becoming less black with licenses like the hero engine, but at least with the art side of things when you ask someone to create a 3D model of a character or object, you either can see it done or not. With code, a programmer can take you on a very long ride without showing results "assuring" you that it is all coming together.


Totally long post. But an example of a outstanding programmer - when Maya first released their fluid dynamic engine for cloth, hair, water, etc... (3D program) and it blew everyone away. One guy wrote the code for that in like a week or something crazy like that. He had an idea and wrote a module that Alias sold in their 3D package for like $7500 each for years and completely pushed what was possible in CGI to a whole new level. Inspired. I heard lots of stories like this. Yet other, far less impressive features, had problems making it live or made it life so bug ridden they were useless in the field.

There you go. For all your high-school kids out there reading this. If you dig programming, learn and and become even half way decent and you'll write yourself a ticket for a great salary all through life.

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