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Reader Comments (14)

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 8:17AM MrGutts said

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I don't think it will because there are some underling issues with ISP's they can't get past.

The first big one is bandwidth caps from the ISP's like ComCrap and AT&T and Verizon. With more and more streaming technologies coming on board like Hulu Amazon or Netflix that tends to take revenues from the big 3. So what do you think they will do? They will tighten down those bandwidth caps even more to get people to use their in house services to make more money.

We will not even go down the road of the bandwidth throttling which they are already doing. It's already bad enough that the US is like a 3rd world country when it comes to ripping off it's customers and developing broadband technology and moving forward with it..

/rant off

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 8:33AM (Unverified) said

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This would undoubtedly revolutionize the gaming world. This isn't the first article i've read relating to this kind of technology, and it seems to be almost certainly the route gaming will go. We are already seeing the integration of technology in to one platform, whereby games, and any other media, will be streamed on demand through a generic set top box.

The only real surprise to me is the speed at which this technology is being developed! The limiting factor seems to be the development and roll out of superfast broadband connections, and the cost implications concerned.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 8:34AM Duffy said

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I don't think it will work particularly well with MMO games. That would entail two subscriptions (three if you want to count their internet in it) year round for most players, who wants to pay that when some of the most popular MMOs can run on tow-three year old machines? If you can afford multiple subscriptions, shouldn't you be able to buy a machine that can run your game of choice? Not to mention inability to use various addons.

Now, I'm not saying there isn't some scenarios where it might work. The MMO hopper would most likely benefit greatly from this arrangement. And there may be some special cases out there where the triple subscription works out better. But for the most part, I do not think it would be used by the majority of MMO players.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 8:35AM (Unverified) said

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It all sounds good... Quite possibly to good. There's a reason MMOs and other online games don't just stream all the content to your computer like this. Increased latency and lag. No matter what technology you are using, you're still adding extra steps into the process which will slow things down. This sort of thing might be good for casual play, like checking the auction house, chatting and the like, but I don't see it being very useful for things like dungeons or PVP.

Another issue when it comes to MMOs is security. This means another site is involved when it comes to your username and password inputs. While the companies involved have a vested interest in not stealing the information (ie, getting caught, losing business and being sued), it's still sharing your log in information further, with more chances of security leaks.

The ad copy may sound good, but it always does. I want to see a lot more details and information before I would think of using a service like this.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 9:16AM LaughingTarget said

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The limiting factor isn't bandwidth, it's hardware. All this service amounts to is a PC rental service or little more than a remote Gaming Cafe access. Systems still need memory, processing and video cards to get these images out into video form to steam to the user.

You won't be getting quality anything trying to simultaneously run two different instances of WoW or any other MMO on a single system. This service is particularly troublesome for more intensive MMOs like AoC, which the service customer base will undoubtably trend toward. This still doesn't remove the requirement to own a PC.

This will be finacially unstable in that regard. It will be far more expensive to subscribe to this system than it would to just upgrade key PC components to run it yourself.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 10:04AM (Unverified) said

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I don't see this is an issue. Bear in mind, the processing needs to be done somewhere, regardless of whether it's at the point of source or on your home pc. I would imagine it would be more cost effective to have the hardware with the game developer rather than with the pc owner.

I can understand your concerns though. At the moment it looks almost impossible to implement, and would inevitably result in a major lag fest.

I was looking more at maybe 5 - 10 years down the line. It'll happen, i'm sure of it. Just not certain how long it'll take.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 10:49AM (Unverified) said

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"I was looking more at maybe 5 - 10 years down the line. It'll happen, i'm sure of it. Just not certain how long it'll take."

So in 5-10 years they'll break the speed of light? Doubtful, and until they do localized input or visual processing will always be necessary for anything even remotely requiring decent reaction times. But, if I'm wrong, make sure to let the guys and gals at NASA know so they can use the tech on their Mars rovers. That 10 minutes signal lag is just killer. Same principle, same result. It's not going away any time soon, not with remote processing servers in the mix.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 11:14AM (Unverified) said

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This kind of service will eventually revolutionise all forms of gameplay, including MMOs, just as much as CD-ROM and 3D graphics did.

Will it do it in the next few years? IMO no. SegaCD (cdrom consoles) and Virtual Reality (firstperson 3D) may have been early pioneers of technologies that rose to become incredibly popular, but they were themselves failures, trying to launch as new and cutting edge when the developers, market or technology just wasn't ready. Barring a miracle and a LOT of evidence that this REALLY works as advertised, OnLive seems to look like the same thing to me.

It's will happen eventually, but it's too early right now.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 11:35AM (Unverified) said

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Given low enough res and high enough bandwidth caps this might work. Of course people probably wont want to pay for low res games that if more then 1 person in the house plays they start having major bandwidth problems.

Also something like a MMO might work because most things can take 100ms-200ms of lag and still be playable. But a FPS? Not a chance. 1/5th of a second is a LONG time in a firefight.

I don't know about everyone else, but this smells like Phantom 2.0 to me.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 12:02PM dudes said

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Two words to answer the question: F#@% No!

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 12:05PM (Unverified) said

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I just don't really see the use for this. how is this new technology? you do the same with your current computer and screen. Just with this you can do it from very far away.
It all just sound like a scam getting you to pay even more money to play games, sure you'll save a bit by not having to upgrade to a new pc every once in so many years.

surely im interesting in how it will work out, specially with latency. Not to mention MMO's tend to have latency from themselves already. would mean massive mazes of connections going from your computer, to the stream computer, to the mmo computer and then back...... No offence but that just seems like taking steps back, not innovation.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 12:11PM (Unverified) said

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Ooh almost forgot to note.
Must really suck if they managed to get a keylogger into that system ;)

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 1:01PM (Unverified) said

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Aoji, it is a new approach.

Right now to play a high res game your computer needs a very powerful GPU that can do huge numbers of calculations and needs a lot of memory to hold all of the programing to render the 3d environment.

However to play a high res video requires very little from your GPU and has much lower programming requirements as it is not rendering the image just putting dots of color on the screen.

Thus you can play a high res video of someone else playing Crysis on your low end computer, but if you were to try to play Crysis on your computer you would slow to a halt.

The problem is that streaming that much video would take a huge amount of bandwidth, the only way to combat the bandwidth usage would be to compress the video stream... but then you would have to decompress it on your side and again would need a powerful computer.

Long story short, this idea will work fine, but with the following problems.

1. High bandwidth use. One person playing 1 game will use up all of a DSL connection on low res.
2. High latency, it will take about 1/5th of a second for any button you press to have any effect on your screen. That would drive me nuts.

This idea really only works if you have HUGE amounts of bandwidth. As in 10Mbits or more. And if you are VERY close to the servers. 30ms would be noticeable but still playable but that would have to be in the same city with you and you both would need a perfect internet connection.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 1:45PM (Unverified) said

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one thing that has confessed me about bot services is

one) see Slacker comments

two) is it just me or are the servicing two different types of games

a) onlive seems to have nothing to do with mmo but allows you to play. computer (non-MMO) games, ps3, wII, and xbox 360 games.

b) Gaikai seems to enjoy more the MMO first then some computer games?

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