| Mail |
You might also like: WoW Insider, Joystiq, and more

Reader Comments (10)

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 4:13PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
The sports analogy is an excellent one and the attitude I try to take towards my Eve playtime and attitude. MMO's are a team sport and should be treated like one within reason. They should not be treated like a second job or anything where if you lose you lose something serious.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 4:37PM Seraphina Brennan said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Bingo. :D Sounds dead on to me.
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 4:16PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
It takes a healthy dose of both "shit happens" and "play to win" by everyone to not take things to seriously.

There's one guy in my guild that gets all kinds of hyper about people not doing exactly what he thinks they should, or not learning the tactics fast enough for raids. I won't group w/ him any longer, b/c he's a baby.

I want the rewards too, but not at the cost of having a good time, and a few laughs along the way. Vic-e-versra, I don't want to be a jack-off the whole time, at the expense of losing.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 4:34PM Seraphina Brennan said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Perfect points JP. I totally agree with both sentiments.

It's extremely hard to find that in a guild, though, which is really curious. It's either people get too silly and begin to just not pay attention and then ask the same question 20 times, or they get too serious and start to make the game into this giant drag.

The best runs are the ones where you are focused and simultaneously relaxed. You're receptive, willing to participate, and are getting a kick out of both loss (and learning) and overcoming obstacles.

Plus, there's just something awesome about going with your guild to kill this bad ass dragon, and then doing it when everyone else said you just didn't have the skills. :D
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 4:23PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
You hit some great points in your article. I have friends who don't take a game seriously enough and can be a drag to play with. I also have friends who obsess over things like choke, packet-loss, fps, ping, and even at times a singular skill point. I think being able to have fun in an MMO, or any game, is a balance of the two.

As a leader, your job is to make the decisions others can't/don't want to make. If someone is being flakey, taking insane amounts of afk time, or half assing it, its up to you to fix the problem. You have other players to consider other than yourself or the problem causer.

Ability to make decisions, gain attention, inspire, and intellect are all keys to being a leader. Everyone has their own style. I've lead WoW raids before where someone decided they were miffed and left. I always felt like they were slapping the other 24 players in the face. And usually, when given the authority, they wouldn't be raiding with us again. I've also kicked afk'ers, even if there was no replacement, and went on with a raid.

Sometimes its addition by subtraction.

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 4:36PM Seraphina Brennan said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Indeed. And it sucks too, because you know the next day there's going to be gossip and drama over how you made your decision, even if it was the right one.

Raiding: Less about boss tactics, more about managing 25 different personalities. XD
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 4:46PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
guild drama makes me giggle.

I listen in vent, read our forums, talk to others or hear them talk about what happened. All the while everyone (myself included) getting all fired up about something stupid.

Then... I walk away from the computer and see my wife and dog just laying around the house. One or both look up and me with kins eyes, and it puts things into perspective for me: Big. Fucking. Deal. Who cares.
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2009 5:09PM mszv said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
This depends on your tolerance for organized team sports, a decent amount of rules, structured roles, big teams. That kind of gameplay requires, not so much a "serious" attitude, exactly, but an attitude where you are comfortable with that kind of structure. It's a war game.

This is not how I choose to enjoy my free time. I do like MMOs, but on my terms. So, solo play, even in an MMO, and limited small group play. I don't think I'm alone, given how solo content has blossomed in MMOs. Some of us don't have the time or the inclination for big time war games. Odds are good I'll never be going on a raids that require all those people.

For all that, even in like minded groups, it's been my observation that groups form, reform and break up all the time. I think this is a difficult structure to maintain. From my conversations with other people, on having a group/guild, I think it's helpful to be clear about what kind of a group you are in. It does seem to me that, even in a "serious" group, you might have to make some allowances for people and their lives, but that's me.

The question - does leading a group like this teach you to be a leader - well, I guess. It teaches you to head up a group where people are like you, where everyone has clear, structured roles, where everyone wants what you want, and everyone reports to you. That's not my world, which is good, because I'd be a terrible fit for that kind of world. My personal experience - even in the world of paid employment (people pay you to do a job and listen to someone) - it's not quite so structured and the roles aren't so clear cut, everyone is not just like you, and the authority and leadership chain is complex - think matrix management. Leadership in my world requires a different set of skills, and a flexibility you don't see in most MMORPG games.

Regards,
mszv

Posted: Mar 29th 2009 6:55PM DrOoo said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
The real reason why people can't take games seriously is because to this day games are just games. People say, why should I take something seriously when there is nothing for me to gain, at least in a way I can show off or brag about it.

Sure you get bragging rights in your respective realm or forum of your choice but the people that don't take it seriously do so because they want to appear to be cool, they want people to know they don't need bragging rights in forums and hey don't care for accomplishments in game because they get those in real life, and that the time he spends playing is just his "free" time or something he decided to do in between work and clubbin, and only because a friend told him to play and his doing him a favor or another lame excuse.

Truth is most people that cant take the game seriously are just @$$holes that are playing the game to show everyone how he has a social life outside of the game and everyone else doesn't, and when you tell him/her to leave or you kick them then they get all worked up at how if "you" had a life you would understand, and how everyone is such a loser for taking the game seriously.

Anything that yo do, do so seriously, don't act like you dont care because everyone has been worked up about something stupid before, if you think you are too good to take it seriously, then join one of those "casual" guilds created for those who have "a real life" and tell me how fun that is.

Posted: Mar 29th 2009 7:31PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I think one could make the case that for Western gamers, particularly those in America, a Protestant spirit still infects how we view and value entertainment. Max Weber developed a much more general account of this view at the turn of the 20th century, and some one hundred years later, it still seems we have an uneasy relationship with entertainment in general. Aren't games pointless? Couldn't you be doing something better than grinding in WoW? Are online games meaningful? How does on reconcile the social interactions and attendant obligations involved in online communities? I think all of this will resolve itself in time but we will have to deal with the transition period, and growing pains, for some time to come.

Featured Stories

Betawatch: December 13 - 19, 2014

Posted on Dec 19th 2014 8:00PM

Massively's Best of 2014 Awards: MMO of the Year

Posted on Dec 19th 2014 11:00AM

Engadget

Engadget

Joystiq

Joystiq

WoW Insider

WoW

TUAW

TUAW