| Mail |
You might also like: WoW Insider, Joystiq, and more

Reader Comments (10)

Posted: Mar 6th 2009 11:55AM Seraphina Brennan said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
*salutes the Grimthorn*

I don't want to see you go, but you and I are 100% hitting the food room again this year at D*C. :D

Posted: Mar 6th 2009 4:31PM Teki said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
sorry to see you go, and just for the record I agree with all your points on this posting.

Posted: Mar 6th 2009 5:42PM Castaa said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Sorry to see you go. I liked your blog a lot. I'm an MMO developer.

Posted: Mar 6th 2009 5:51PM TheJackman said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Again Blizzard did already have a list of really great titles when they release world of warcraft it was a no brainier to pick it up!

Posted: Mar 6th 2009 6:24PM archipelagos said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Sorry to see you go and I agree with pretty much all your points. Very well written indeed.

Posted: Mar 6th 2009 8:11PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Regarding #5, not sure if it was Turbine's target to get "older players" playing, but there are A LOT of players over the age of 25 in Lord of the Rings Online. Which might explain why its probably the most mature and friendliest communities out there. :)

Posted: Mar 7th 2009 1:43AM deluxe2000 said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
The achievement system one of the top 3 greatest innovations in MMO gaming? omg...

Posted: Mar 7th 2009 1:56AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Ahh, a skeptic.

Think about it like this. If you're a level 80 Death Knight in World of Warcraft, do you have any incentive at all to go back and run old dungeons or experience old world content without the achievement system?

If you're a City of Heroes player, do you have any reason to explore Galaxy City if you started in Atlas Park without badges?

From a development perspective, "Achievement Systems" give you the holy grail of game development, replayability. It gives players a reason to go back and explore content that they missed when they were levelling their characters to begin with.

Sure, it's not for everyone, and your most hardcore raiders might have zero interest in going back and exploring low level content, but it keeps casuals entertained, and casuals are a large subscriber base than hardcore players are. If you want to keep players, you have to give them stuff to do, and achievements maximize the available content by giving players stuff to do other than the most recent end-game content.

So yeah, it's a pretty big deal.
Reply

Posted: Mar 8th 2009 3:49PM deluxe2000 said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
The quest system that WoW introduced - question mark above the head, list of rewards - that was MMO innovation, something you see in all MMOs now. Instances another form of innovation. But achievements have been in MMOs for years in the form of titles and such - see EQ2,LOTRO, Guild Wars for multiple examples.

So no, achievements may have freshened up WoW, kind of like player housing would, but its not an MMO innovation by any stretch.
Reply

Posted: Mar 8th 2009 6:51PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I didn't say that WoW was responsible for those innovations. On the contrary, Everquest has a user-customizable interface, and has for years.

Most of the credit for achievements should probably go to City of Heroes (at least it is the first game that I remember with an achievement system).

As for voice chat, I don't think any game can claim credit for it as much as Ventrilo and Teamspeak can.

In fact, as you say, the only real innovation that I think WoW might be able to claim credit for is it's quest system, and I'm not entirely sure they were first to do that.

Featured Stories

Engadget

Engadget

Joystiq

Joystiq

WoW Insider

WoW

TUAW

TUAW