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Reader Comments (22)

Posted: Dec 21st 2008 4:14PM (Unverified) said

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Wouldn't it be considered as some sort of discrimination to disallow someone to a place in a job, because of their hobbies?

Posted: Dec 21st 2008 4:22PM (Unverified) said

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Sure it would. Of course, such discrimination is perfectly legal. It's only illegal in the US to discriminate based on things like race, religion, sex, etc.

Discrimination isn't the "evil word", it's HOW you discriminate that makes it illegal.

-Grim
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Posted: Dec 22nd 2008 12:14AM Ghede said

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Hmm. Solving the problem!

Three words: Disciples of Arthas
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Posted: Dec 21st 2008 4:46PM (Unverified) said

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This could be an opportunity for hiring managers in the know to hire people with well-developed teamwork and problem solving skills. At my workplace we're very short on people with problem-solving and computer skills.

Posted: Dec 21st 2008 5:06PM (Unverified) said

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If you can't make the obvious lie during a job interview maybe you shouldn't get hired. I'm not going to talk about my taste in pornography or music, why would I mention video games during a job interview? If they ask I'd just say I don't play them.

Posted: Dec 21st 2008 5:27PM (Unverified) said

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Unfortunately, just playing MMOs is no proof-positive of problem solving skills and the ability to work effectively on a team - or even of computer literacy.

There are both idiots and geniuses who play MMOs - same as with any passtime. If you are a great candidate and play MMOs I really doubt anyone would instantly disqualify you. If you aren't particularly impressive I don't think it'll help your case.

Posted: Dec 21st 2008 5:43PM (Unverified) said

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MMO's = grinding
work = grinding

How can anyone in their right sense claim that MMO's are Not Equal to work?

If anything, mmo'ers should be better workers than others.
What it comes down to is just the kind of light the recruiter puts it into.
From my experience, mmo gamers preform the highest at my job. Hardcore mmo gamers though. Not the casual bunsh. They are normally equally casual at work.

Posted: Dec 21st 2008 5:51PM (Unverified) said

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I guarantee you about 1/3 of my coworkers woudn't know where to find WoW in their start menu. And another third would want a class in it instead of figuring it out themselves. I spend large parts of my day (as a secretary because our IT people are too mean) helping people print and finding where they've saved their files, or most often teaching them not to edit files right from outlook.
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Posted: Dec 21st 2008 6:27PM (Unverified) said

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Of course companies would not hire those with kids if they were legally allowed to do so.

Posted: Dec 21st 2008 6:54PM Graill440 said

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First off, a game is not a job, nor is it a place to hone or create skills such as leadership, integrity, being trustworthy, or any number of people skills used in the rela world. The classic spetum from gamers saying they develop leadership skills playing online games is a joke on the highest magnitude.

Hiring someone for any job (including something in the gaming industry itself) should be a deliberate, careful evaluation of a persons skills in the real world. Can they function in situations that would make folks with average common sense question them or their actions, and do they have the functioning skill set to complete complex tasks and lead others in complex projects (no virginia raiding is not a complex project).

Hiring someone must be based on industry standards, these are available on any competant jobseeking website or hiring agency.

The HR that hires and fires cannot discriminate any potential employee based on habits, physical shortcomings, mental shortcomings, gender, the list goes on, again a complicated task. However, if the HR finds that the applicants recreational habits will affect the job description and or employees then this can indeed be a discriminator, use common sense examples.

The HR must be trained in equal oppurtunity, ISO certified hiring practices and themselves be trained to evaluate complicated questions like the one posed by the author of this piece, anything less is not to standard.

Posted: Dec 21st 2008 7:46PM (Unverified) said

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I agree with you that in 9 out of 10 cases, games won't develop leadershipskills through an online game.

But if you look down towards the core of how hardcore gaming works, then you find alot of the same situations as in the real world.

In alot of hardcore guilds, people see it as a job to run the guild. Its a pure grind, and its not allways as fun as most would think. Its a chore, and a work nontheless.

http://www.wowgoons.com/

This guild. One of the most known multigame based guilds in the world is basically structurred as a little company.

I'm not saying what they are doing there is a good model, but they have realised the potential in gaming, and they are making more out of it than just to have a bit of fun.

And then lets not forget how work is fun to alot of people too. If you love the chore or fun that is MMO's, then you might as well love the chore or fun that is a certain kind of jobs.

When it comes to the question if you learn something from it. It mostly comes down to human relations. How the members are treated. The whole trialling deal. Lootsystem, and dkp. And lets not forget about how some guilds even have gatherings irl, and travel to different countries to meet up.

There are alot of factors that correspond to cetrain types of companies, or at least entrepreneur firms through MMO gaming.

However, alot of people don't realise it, and by far the largest base are terrible at it. But to generalise, and say it is a huge joke to compare the two, wuold be wrong.

We are after all nothing more than the sum of our experiences.
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Posted: Dec 21st 2008 8:01PM (Unverified) said

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I do however believe that mmo's can help evolve leadership, integrity, being trustworthy, or any number of people skills.

Most likely you will need to have learned about those things in another scenario prior to the mmo.

I just see it as wrong when you claim the mmo's have no value. You are probably the one lacking knowledge here then. Not every single gamer.
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Posted: Dec 21st 2008 7:02PM UnSub said

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As a side note: Hilarious.

Posted: Dec 21st 2008 7:33PM Idle said

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As long as they play the same games as I play. 8)

Posted: Dec 21st 2008 9:13PM (Unverified) said

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shanoyu, they're being silly if they would even ask you if you watch pornography. It's one of those "Ahem?" questions, or "Wah?!", or "Escuse me?"

shanoyu: "If you can't make the obvious lie during a job interview maybe you shouldn't get hired. I'm not going to talk about my taste in pornography or music, why would I mention video games during a job interview? If they ask I'd just say I don't play them."

I don't see why you would TALK about your tastes, unless they asked you, as you say. In which case, they are being silly for asking and don't even deserve a response. Hahaha, I get it. "I don't listen to Slipknot or Rage Against The Machines. I am uninterested in naked pictures of Lindsey Lohan. I have not seen Serenity. I don't watch movies. I have not read books like The Sword of Shannara or The Lord of the Rings, nor I Robot. Women uninterest me (Male intended statement). Women uninterest me (Female intended statement :D). I don't go to strip clubs, and barely ever drink alcoholic beverages."

Posted: Dec 22nd 2008 4:14AM (Unverified) said

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Pretty stupid if someone was to discriminate for job hiring based on you playing an MMO.

I personally have been playing them for many years now and have one of the best, if not the best, attendance record at work. I have four sick days to use up before the end of the year.

Now let's turn this around into something that would get a company sued. What if they discriminate against women, especially those with children? Women often miss work due to sick children. Women get pregnant, which is a huge problem for months at the work place. And women have a tendency to be more social and chat in the work place, wasting work time.

So employers should avoid hiring women, as they will be poor employees. Of course, if a employer was to say or do that and get caught, they would get sued and have women's rights organization kicking down their doors.

So it's pathetic any one would ever discriminate against a gamer. There far more evidence against hiring women than gamers, and no one is saying to do that.

Posted: Dec 22nd 2008 9:48AM (Unverified) said

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I agree with your argument but I think you're missing the larger point that gaming is considered deviant social behavior.

"If "frequent use of personal leave" is an issue, then why do you offer personal time off as a benefit? If it is considered socially acceptable to take the Monday after the Super Bowl off of work, or the Friday after Thanksgiving, or St. Patrick's Day, or any other "non-recognized" holiday, then why is it a big deal when a gamer takes a day off to play a new game?"

It is a big deal because within our contemprorary cultural context, those forms of "personal leave" are acceptable social behavior (at least in some circles). You're assuming here that the gamer isn't taking these same days off and is instead trying to take a day off for his chosen hobby. Granting that, managers will still look poorly on such a request by virtue of how they view the hobby.

Imagine your own gut, immediate reaction if a subordinate asked for a three day weekend for a long awaited BDSM role play session. I think most manager's reactions to gaming as a hobby are like in kind if not in degree.

Posted: Dec 23rd 2008 11:30AM (Unverified) said

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The point is that it SHOULD in all fairness be viewed the same. At the end of the day all that matters is the performance of the employee, if that person wants the same amount of days off for gaming as another person does for other "more mainstream" activities, why should the person be denied on context alone?

On the flip side of this, I don't have much tolerance for most pretty much every popular American sport. I don't accept taking the day after the Super Bowl off as valid in any sense. That's pretty much saying "I intend to be drunk."
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Posted: Dec 22nd 2008 9:36AM postman said

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Thanks Kevin for writing this. I agree with everything that you've said. the fact of the matter is that, even though funny, things like "make love not warcraft" and the AoC/Big Bang Theory episode dont help with this arguement at all, the sterotypes have been made. unfortunatly there is a negetive stereotype for gamers, especially MMO gamers and this is county (america) that as much as we dont want to admit it at times, thrives on stereotypes to help cushion ourselves. i live in the midwest, where people regularly take days off to go hunting during deer and pheasant season, and taking a day off to play whatever is no different, its just not as socially acceptable. besides i dont have to pay for tags to kill dwarves, or clean them afterwards >.

Posted: Dec 22nd 2008 11:43AM (Unverified) said

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Partner in a software developer company. We actually want applicants to be gamers. MMO Gamers tend to be up on the latest technologies. We do not want dinosaurs. Hell, for my company and basically all the companies we deal with, if you have anything to do with IT, you better be a gamer or you are an outcast.

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