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Reader Comments (4)

Posted: Dec 6th 2008 1:53PM (Unverified) said

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I really play to kill time and escape real life stress, i enjoy bgs and making money :), while making friends on the road.

I was on one of those hardcore guilds and it felt like a job.. the fun was lost, then i moved to a casual friendly guild and i am enjoying the game more.

Posted: Dec 6th 2008 4:13PM J Brad Hicks said

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I have a very hard-nosed attitude about the "not-fun" aspects of any MMO I'm playing: I balance how many hours of not-fun the designer expected me to have and how not-fun it would be against how fun the achievement would be, and how many hours of fun I'd get out of it. For me, this almost always balances out on the side of skipping the not-fun. For example, in City of Heroes, I looked at what it would take to get some of those badges, even some of those badge combinations that grant additional superpowers, and said "screw it, not worth it, I will just plain never have that badge."

These are games. Not jobs. If it turns into a job I pay someone else to let me work at, I go do something else. If I run out of something else to do in the game, I stop paying.

But it's not all that surprising that we have this. I'm seriously old school; one of the visiting lecturers when I was getting my computer science degree was Grace Hopper. So I remember the *original* definition of a computer hacker: "someone who will sit at a computer terminal in a basement lab for three straight days, eating nothing that didn't come out of a vending machine and not bathing, for no reward other than to hear another hacker yell, 'how in the heck did you get it to do THAT?'" People who think like that designed all to many sub-systems in our MMOs.

Posted: Dec 7th 2008 4:52AM (Unverified) said

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Progressionguilds were the flagships of WoW as far as I saw it. Hell, being a part of one (two actually), I saw how the servers community ceterred around progression, and the race surrounding that.

I'm absolutely agreeing here with the idea that tracking progression is no longer viable though. After having wiped max 3 times on any boss in wotlk raiding with below average gear says it all. The time for tracking, and ranking is over.

For some, me included, that was perhaps the number one reason to play WoW. In a way, I think this is the beginning of the end for WoW.

Sure, the expansion is better than ever. Much better than both original wow and tbc in terms of style, quests, and amount of different things to do. But it lacks the epic sense of raiding in a meaningfull way.

The soul is ripped out. Sure the body will keep living for awhile, but when we run out of content, and all realise there is just a single player agme left, we will all figure out that if we want to play a single player game, then there are much better options out there.

Posted: Dec 8th 2008 4:42PM Leumas said

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I played WoW and now play EVE.
Besides the casual community aspect that I find enjoyable, I like discovering the virtual world. I explored places in WoW just to see them. I had a caracter of every class and every race, just to try them out and see the starting areas and quests. Now, on EVE, I bounce between different aspects of the game (mining, manufacturing, PvP, PvE, exploration) and travel to see the 'sights' of the game. I don't want to be the best, just play it enough mostly to get a feel for it. I find that fun.

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