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Posted: Sep 26th 2008 1:09PM (Unverified) said

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While this is a vaguely interesting concept, what is the point? If it's to be more realistic, it's not. Real-world economies are not based on static resource levels - governments print money to keep cash flowing into the system and mines and quarries are constantly churning out fresh materials. World economies work on a concept of constant growth, and there can be no growth in the economy you describe.

So really, what's the point? Would it make the game more realistic? No. Would it make it more fun? No (a matter of opinion of course). Would it be ripe for abuse? Yes.

Posted: Sep 26th 2008 1:26PM (Unverified) said

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Awesome post. Obviously it would drive alot of players nuts, not being able to deposit items in the banks at all, but making resources degrade automatically is a brilliant way to solve hording problems. Maybe I missed it somewhere though, but you never talked about item binding, the "no drop" quality. In the original EQ they didn't have that and it let to massive inflation over time as more and more items and gold flooded the system. If you limit gold but not items then item prices will fall over time as supply increases. Without binding players have little incentive to sell items they are no longer using back to NPCs or smelt them down. They would just sell them to other players, this is bad long term for the economy as the supply just grows grows grows and all the none gold capital (that goes into weapons, armor, etc) gets monopolized. I think degrading over time isn't sufficient to remove these item from the game (especially if gold and items are liquid with one another which they really can't be because how the hell would you set the price?). Even resmelting wouldn't be enough of incentive if you can get what the item is really worth from another player. I think without requiring that most decent items are no drop or bind on use is the only way to get players to recycle them (sell them to NPC's or smelt them). You could maybe perhaps have large rents on your houses or guild halls, thereby giving people an event stronger incentive to not hold items, but then you are going to make people either grind more for money (not fun or ideal) or have no where to put their items. All in all awesome post, but I don't think it works without items binding (once used cannot be sold to another player character). Thanks.

Posted: Sep 26th 2008 1:27PM (Unverified) said

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i dont see the system working to well because it puts way too many chains on the player

Posted: Sep 26th 2008 6:03PM (Unverified) said

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Nice posts. I'd like to throw in a few cents, in the hopes that they circulate through the economy and one day return to my pocket after a bit of work.
First, a question. I'm assuming theres a limited amount of iron ore. The low level characters need their knives and cheaply produced swords to get started as an adventurer, which may require 1 iron ingot per weapon. So there could be tons of these knives out in the world at once. Would you have the higher grade weapons require more ingots? This would reduce the amount of powerful weapons floating around, and in itself be a type of hoarding; a high level player can hoard enough ingots in his weapons and armor to outfit a small tribe of low level characters.
Second, you mention magic drawing from a different reserve than other parts of the economy. This makes sense to me, and can be expanded. Other resources could have their own limitations. Organic weapons and armor naturally deteriorate, and have a natural regrowth cycle. A city that can only support so many cows can only have so much leather armor at a time, for instance.
Finally, this economy may require a player mentality less focused on flashing bling at high levels as the ultimate goal of playing, and more focused on the daily struggle to survive in the game world. People expecting flashy items permanently bound to their character won't enjoy the necessary item degradation. I'd be up for it, however. My favorite part of UO was being able to start over after a wipe-out by monsters or other players. Get the knife out, carve up a bow and arrows, slay some orcs to get their armor, eventually find a magic weapon as loot, and viola, I'm once again a threat to hostile players.

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