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Reader Comments (6)

Posted: Sep 21st 2008 6:07PM Wgraves said

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Lag behind the fleet a little, this will keep you from being called first primary.

Stay cloaked/ away from fleet till the engagement starts(see above), then warp in once your FC has called ewar targets. Immediately align to GTFO, and do so if any tackle ships head your way, remember your 20 sec ECM timer works whether your there or not. Warp out and warp back in at new optimal (usually 150 km). Rinse and Repeat.

The biggest thing is to stay aligned and at speed, and watch your overview.

And for the love of god your DPS is completely not important. Ie fit utility highs, and keep in your optimal for ECM not your guns/ missiles.

Other than those things, your a valued member of any fleet so you shouldn't have trouble finding a corp/ gang on a regular basis.

Posted: Sep 21st 2008 7:32PM Brendan Drain said

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This is all great advice. There's nothing better than engaging the enemy and springing a pack of cloaked falcons or arazus on them.

Something I see all too much is electronic warfare ships getting in close and worrying about their damage. Apart from energy neutralising ships, staying outside of weapons range is top priority. As nice as it is to get on a bunch of killmails with damage done, that doesn't win fleet battles.
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Posted: Sep 23rd 2008 11:31PM SeanG said

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Why on earth would you fit TD's on a BB or Celestis? Arbi gets huge TD bonus and can defend itself to boot.

However modern EvE sniper duels take place at 200km+ making T1 cruisers rather challenging to use as E-War platforms without a dedicated Cov-Op's warp in. I've done it but it's tough ;-)

Posted: Sep 24th 2008 2:21AM Brendan Drain said

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The arbitrator's bonus is only 5% per level to strength for a maximum of 25% bonus. The difference is between -50% enemy optimal range and -62%, which isn't all that impressive. Since the arbitrator has only four mid slots and has a lower base lock range, the logical choice for tracking disruptors is the celestis or blackbird.

Using an arbitrator for this task would require at least two sensor boosters, leaving only two mid slots for tracking disruptors assuming you don't have a microwarpdrive. Using a blackbird (which has a base lock range of almost 94km with good skills), you only need one sensor booster in a mid slot and two signal amplifiers in the lows to reach over 190km. Even using two sensor boosters on their own to get over 220km lock range, you still have four mid slots remaining to use for tracking disruptors. You can afford to use an extra disruptor on each enemy to more than compensate for the missing 25% bonus.

You're right about it being challenging facing a sniper fleet as an electronic warfare pilot. In my experience, a good warp-in point (like a covops) and a microwarpdrive are both essential. Still, if a single cruiser can keep two or three sniper battleships from being effective for even a few minutes, they've done their fleet a massive service.
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Posted: Nov 3rd 2008 7:17AM (Unverified) said

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Is there any reason you dont mention any Minmatar ship?

Posted: Nov 3rd 2008 7:32AM Brendan Drain said

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Yep. Minmatar electronic warfare ships specialise in target painters and webs, neither of which is really considered electronic warfare. Target painters don't debilitate a target, just make it easier to hit. They're like a tracking computer but instead of increasing your ability to hit anyone, they increase everyone's ability to hit one target.

As such, target painters really fall under damage-dealing like tracking computers would and are hard to fit into the topic of electronic warfare. Similarly, stasis webs fall under the heading of tackling and getting into either of these topics would warrant another article on its own.
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