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Reader Comments (8)

Posted: Aug 1st 2008 8:20AM Greeen said

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yep, you hit bullseye here.
as long as there were new exciting frontiers, people accepted the bugs differently than now. look at what happened to aoc - people don't accept a bugged mmo at launch anymore. they leave and have plenty of choice today, even if the choices are still similar.
lotro e.g. : a great polished game, but it lacks the je-ne-sais-quois. the next expansion? raise level cap....

Posted: Aug 1st 2008 9:17AM (Unverified) said

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No, I think I'm going to have to disagree.

While we can probably all come up with some examples of firstly profit-motivated developers, the flip side is that the huge commercial success of some has allowed the market to get to the point where interesting projects do have a chance.

At the same time I would argue that there was no exciting new frontier, not really, that kind of thinking is more nostalgia and something for the hardcore, oldskool, whatever people who like to go "that's not an MMO, back in the day when I played EQ/Lineage/whatever.." and "they so stole that from.." during beta and launch periods.

And then they go "omg you can't even jump in this game!!" So much for accepting doing things differently.

Face it people, money makes the world go around. But lumping all developers on the same pile is not giving the genre as a whole enough credit. Plenty of innovation in the last few years, plenty more to come.

Posted: Aug 1st 2008 1:53PM Saker said

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I do agree. I have been in a huge number of alpha/betas in this genre since the alpha of meridian 59. Things are very "stuck" in this genre, and have been for some time in my opinion. It's largely about the money-men dictating to the developers as is often been commented on. I've believed for a long time a non level, non class based game made by people of creativity, and talent could break the genre out of it's funk. I don't subscribe (and haven't for some time) to any of these games as I find them all too boring, the emphasis on getting to the magic "end game" where the fun is, well I don't find grinding to that magic land any fun (or worth my money) at all. There are few games in development that I even have hopes for at this point. My belief is that this genre is heading towards a crash in the not-distant future if there aren't some real innovations soon. Prettier graphics just aren't going to cut it.

Posted: Aug 1st 2008 11:12AM Sain34 said

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I believe WoW really cut the legs out from under any inovation in the genre. Developers with a small game can't look for that one invovative edge to get them on top of the pile anymore. It doesn't matter what you do or how awesome your game is you still just another MMO that ISNT WoW. The commercialism of WoW has stoped any real progression in the genre.

Posted: Aug 1st 2008 4:41PM (Unverified) said

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Can't, or won't? How many game developers out there are trying to be the next WoW-killer? Spore is looking to be something new and different. But will it make money like WoW? Probably not. If they try, they will likely fail.

It's sort of like chasing our lead rogue on the DPS charts. It will only end in death.
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Posted: Aug 1st 2008 12:22PM (Unverified) said

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I would have to disagree. You can't blame WoW for the decisions that producers or designers of a game choose to do. If they decide to make a "WoW-Clone" to try and capitalize off of the other's success and then fail...whose fault is that? I believe that WoW's popularity is actually a GOOD thing. Think about it.. just 10 years or so ago it seemed as though playing an MMO was more niche than PC gaming itself was; now MMOs and PC games in general have become much more mainstream. Yes, with that you're going to have the flagrant copies to try and make a quick buck, but you have that with everything. In the end though, success of this level brings in more people which can only strengthen our hobby as a whole. With a larger market comes more chance to "be different" and make the next big thing. You also have more people looking into this genre to see what other games are out there and this in turn will boost the others.

Posted: Aug 1st 2008 1:08PM wjowski said

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The MMO genre's always been commercialized. It took money to build and maintain a virtual world then and it takes money to build and maintain a virtual world today. Hell, even the best text-based MUDs 'strongly encouraged' (often by offering in-game incentives) donations.

Posted: Aug 2nd 2008 12:55AM (Unverified) said

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This is madness. Have you LOOKED at the "Upcoming MMOs" section of Massively?

http://www.massively.com/category/new-titles

Sure, lots of coverage of the big names like WAR, but my god, there is a HUGE number of MMOs under development, and in an incredibly broad range of genres and styles.

"WoW really cut the legs out from under any inovation in the genre"? That's the most ridiculous thing I ever heard. The MMO market in the west is something like 10x the size now as it was prior to WoW. Now you could realistically pitch a project with a prediction "we think this could capture as much as 1% of the market!" and that would be a profitable prospect. And it shows.

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