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Reader Comments (7)

Posted: Apr 27th 2008 7:57PM (Unverified) said

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There are already a few openly available MMO engines out there - Google for "Minions of Mirth" (or the "torque mmo kit") from the indie world, or "Multiverse" for something doing the sort of revenue sharing model you mention (I know less about multiverse, but have played with the code for the torque one, and it'd be a good starting point for building MMOs). I know there are others, but don't have references currently.

Looking at the Torque one, people are building their own MMOs, but an MMO relies on a decent subscriber base, and without marketing it seems to be really hard to get enough people together to populate a world. Not sure why that's different to text muds, but they used to be comfortable to play with only a handful of people on, whereas graphical muds feel somehow empty really easily. Perhaps there's not the population of people willing to try smaller games around now - everyone jumps to the various free or for-pay larger games.

Posted: Apr 28th 2008 8:04PM (Unverified) said

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It's not just marketing and development that the micro-mmo efforts lack. It's a lack of consensual gameplay interface and conventions.

The MMO universe is still embryonic and rapidly evolving. Nobody even knows what the perfect interface looks like, and everything will change as new technology becomes adapted to the issue.

Eventually people will figure out what the ground rules are, and people will become bored by ever-more-spectacular graphics. Then writing and plot design and emotional spectacle will become more important as MMO's settle into their adolescence.
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Posted: Apr 28th 2008 10:56AM (Unverified) said

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Are millions of WoW-derived worlds good? My opinion: http://www.mxac.com.au/drt/PersonalVirtualWorlds.htm

Posted: Apr 28th 2008 11:01AM (Unverified) said

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Mike, I read your comments and you make some great points. I don't think that I personally would like online games to be as ubiquitous as blogs (because I do think there would be a high level of bad or cookie cutter games), but I do think that having more of them would mean that there's more chance for a really good one to emerge.

Posted: Apr 28th 2008 8:04PM (Unverified) said

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I agree with this article; it says basically the same thing that I've been thinking for years. As the technology for 3D MUDs (MMO's) matures, more and more code relating to them will be available. If a truly successful popular code base were released, some truly phenomenal homebrew creativity could be unleashed to the benefit of the entire industry.

The golden ring here would be a standardization of protocols that allow MMO's to interoperate so that instead of one game per character, we could have a consistent personal presence across many games and turn a million virtual reality games into one universe with many facets.

This would create a virtual reality metaverse that would be much more entertaining to interact with because you would identify much more strongly with your character from game to game.

Posted: May 2nd 2008 4:16PM (Unverified) said

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Why would they? They corner the market ... they have 90% of the entire MMO subs for the western world, they have no reason to.

I very much doubt they would even consider it.

Posted: Apr 29th 2008 5:48PM (Unverified) said

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While 90% might be a slight exaggeration, they're certainly the biggest dog on the block.

That's today, though. Who knows what tomorrow holds?

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