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Posted: Jan 16th 2008 10:29PM (Unverified) said

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EveMon? I agree with the article, it's a very interesting question -- but EveMon is just a tool for players to plan and monitor their skills, and doesn't make data available to anyone other than you (unless you explicitly instruct it to do so).

Posted: Jan 17th 2008 1:31AM Mike Schramm said

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You make a good point. What I really meant was EVE's API, which EVEMon uses. Changed the post.
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Posted: Jan 17th 2008 3:37PM GreenArmadillo said

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Example Scenario:
1. A raiding guild requires 50% raid attendance of all members and uses a DKP system to award loot to better attending members, but otherwise does not actively sanction members for not being at a given raid.

2. Healer Bob receives the Orange Box for his birthday and, being comfortably above the attendence threshold, schedules himself a night "off" to play through Portal in such a way that leadership knows in advance, or at least should have known if they were paying attention to the signups, that Bob would not be available that night.

3. For reasons that are neither Bob's fault nor responsibility (he has fulfilled his responsibilities as a member of the guild, same as anyone else, and it isn't his job to make sure the guild has enough roster depth to arrange back-ups for raid slots), there is no other healer available that night and the raid is canceled.

4. The raid leader, Joe, opens up Facebook and discovers that Bob was playing a different computer game. Joe gets pissed off, even though Bob's absence would not have been an issue if Bob had been with family or otherwise offline. Drama ensues.

Bottom line? It's none of Joe's business what Bob was doing with his night off. Therefore, it should be Bob's decision whether or not to tell anyone what he was doing, especially when it's foreseeable that Joe is going to get pissed off about it. (I've been in a struggling raiding guild, and I can tell you that there are otherwise very reasonable "Joe"s out there who would behave in exactly this manner.)

More seriously, imagine a partnership between Steam and Facebook where the latter broadcasts all the gaming you do on your profile without your advance consent. (This is basically what their recent advertising scheme did with your purchases until the mainstream media found out about it and they had to let people opt out to end the bad press.) Now imagine that Bob's real world boss knows how to find his Facebook profile. Is it the boss's business how much time Bob spends playing games on his own time? Absolutely not. Is it possible that the boss will consider that knowledge, if he gets his hands on it? Do you really want to find out?

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