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Reader Comments (7)

Posted: Jan 7th 2008 10:24AM (Unverified) said

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I, like you, fell in love with DR's very simple hack and slash gameplay. It brought me back to the days of Diablo (the first game that really started my addiction) and where simplicity ruled. I played DR after I "retired" from WoW after a couple years of playing. It's a good refreshing game. I even paid the membership fee for a couple of months. But that leads me to my point. I paid the membership fee so I could attain new and better items. Why? Not only because it made it a whole lot easier to kill mobs (even easier than it was before) but also because I have a huge competitive side. I play games to challenge myself. I can no longer play single player games, games that don't have interaction with other people.

That's the reason MMO's interest me so much is because they are the only real type of games that I don't grow bored of extremely quickly. People add a complexity to a game that is required (for me) to get enjoyment. Mainly, why should I feel good about being able to kill said mob solo when any little kid can do the same thing, with little to no effort. What is fun for me is to kill a said mob, with maybe 3 people in which it usually required 5+, using skills/strategies/macros and whatnot.

While PVP can be frustrating because someone outgears you etc, that also is motivating you to get the better gear, and become a better player (i.e. macros/research/strats etc) I have come to find out, complexities are the exact reason what brings me to gaming, and continue to play the same game.

While I agree DR is a great game to play. It doesn't hold people for an extended period of time. Excellent game if you've burnt out on a game, but still need to fill that gaming crave. But it's just a snack, you'll start to get hungry again. Alas, the reason I started playing WoW again. That and you can actually make real $ off WoW, but not games like DR. ;)

Posted: Jan 7th 2008 12:57PM Ghen said

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I like my commenters simple too. That was a giant wall of text there spars.

Posted: Jan 7th 2008 1:09PM (Unverified) said

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I disagree with this part of your essay: "But, why should players be expected to ... assist in its development in order to play it properly?"

This assumes that there is one "best" way, but a quick look at the many addons that do similar things shows that different players want different features and behaviors. So Blizzard delivers the core set and we get to play around (or not) finding the extras that make us wiggle like puppies. You all wiggle, right?

Posted: Jan 7th 2008 1:21PM (Unverified) said

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I wiggle.

Good point, jst8. I'm all for customization as long as all gamers are aware of the options available to them, and as long as developers don't use it as a crutch for incomplete or ineffective design.
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Posted: Jan 7th 2008 1:09PM Alarie said

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DR is one of those games where I sat down thinking I got 30mins to play I'll play some DR and see what I get done. Look at the clock later and it's been an hour and half! Just a lot of fun playing that game.

Posted: Jan 7th 2008 1:12PM (Unverified) said

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LOL! But, a good wall of text! Spars made some excellent points to both counter and compliment my own.

I'm proud of the intelligent discussion I've seen on many of my MMOGology posts (including comments you've made too Ghen).

Keep it up guys, and maybe we'll see some innovation trickle into the games we play in the future.

Posted: Jan 7th 2008 2:11PM GRT said

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(Apologies if this rather long comment appears twice)

I also played and enjoyed DR for a while. In fact some of the silly things the NPC characters come out with have stuck with my girlfriend (who never played, but sure heard the game and I) and I in our little micro-culture.

I'm with jst8 (gestate?) though, I think being able to modify the UI is a strength of games like WoW and to a lesser extent EQ2 (and I'm sure there are others) rather than a flaw. After you get comfortable with the default UI, and play and play and play, little things that might work for most people start to bug you personally, and there's a way to tweak things to make the game more enjoyable for yourself. It seems like a win-win situation, in particular when the devs take the most popular mods and roll them into the standard UI.

I'll also take some exception to this:

"Gameplay elements such as reputation grinding (or faction alignment), gear acquisition and upgrades, and large party raid content are standard fare in playing an online role playing game. But are such gameplay elements and world design elements really necessary?"

I do think in fact that gear acquisition and upgrades *are* necessary (and in fact DR has this in spades). The first time I tried playing EQ2, my girlfriend, a hardcore EQ2 fan, gave my character all the gear he'd need for the first 20 levels or so. Almost all the quest rewards and all of the dropped loot was just vendor trash to me, and I really didn't like the game much at all.

With the recent expansion (Rise of Kunark) I've tried the game again, and this time with no 'twinking' from the S.0. At the same time Sony seems to have enhanced the kinds of loot one finds in drops. And this time around I'm loving EQ2, since every "Treasure Chest" that drops is like a new lottery ticket... I might (and sometimes do) win big and get a piece of gear that is an upgrade.

So to me at least, improving gear is a huge part of the satisfaction I get from these games, and that, I think, goes all the way back to Diablo.

Marc, have you had a chance to try Mythos yet? I think you'll like that one a lot, too.

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