| Mail |
You might also like: WoW Insider, Joystiq, and more

Reader Comments (10)

Posted: Dec 5th 2007 8:52AM Grizz said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Wow, just wow. You outdid yourself. As someone who avidly plays with his wife, some of these simple suggestions slipped right by me.

I'm going to go home tonight and start a new toon with my wife on a new server! (*Plan ahead)

Posted: Dec 5th 2007 9:59AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Heh...My other half and I had many "dates" in Everquest back when she lived three hours away. We never successfully pulled off the duo thing, though. We have a couple in our WoW guild right now who managed to do that on Blood Elves when BC came out. They got all the way to Outland leveling up at practically the same time. Didn't last, though.

Posted: Dec 5th 2007 10:02AM ymiris said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
This is why the wife and I started couple gaming, because we truly believe that it can be a great activity for couples! I will have to link to this article from couple gaming ;)

Posted: Dec 5th 2007 11:19AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
We are fans of alliterative names, when Spazz and I did cooperative in Diablo 2 we called ourselves Smaash and Baash. I can never remember which one I was though...

Ironically he's made a Smash for Rock Band, but my singer is named Pix :) Not so much matchy-matchy, but they look great together ;)

Posted: Dec 5th 2007 2:50PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Me and my bud from JHS started playing mmo's and we remained good friends otherwise we would not be in contact with one another today.

Posted: Dec 5th 2007 8:13PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Ah, that explains it. My husband's a Power Gamer. At least I meet up with his paladin from time to time when our guild does Karazhan. : /

Posted: Dec 9th 2007 4:04PM Impulsivity said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
The only problem I've run into with this is the inevitable gap in skill that accompanies MMOs. The chance of two top .5% players getting together organically in the real world is very small. This means the ability to do an arena team with your sig other (if you want any chance of doing well) or doing difficult quests in any game is not great unless the better of the two player wants to accept poor progress and performance. Many people don't think in this way especially initially but if you play a tanker and she plays a Defender who lets you die when not OOM/power it comes down to voicing displeasure or burying it deep down inside and never bringing it up again while it festers.

I'm sure anyone who has played these games noticed that people tend to break off into segments based largely on their skill especially endgame. I end up with my top .5% in WoW getting a gladiator title and she ends up off doing her own thing, I end up in a top raiding guild and she doesn't make the cut. In some ways different skill levels becomes a sort of albatross around your neck. The only way duos work really well is if you're both exceptional players (very rare given the population of exceptional players especially within the female playing female subset) or are both mediocre and ok with that. Leveling together doesn't help the skill gap, it just delays the problem which usually surfaces more in endgame.

Posted: Dec 10th 2007 7:00AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@7:
I admit up front that I lucked out on that score. My wife of 7 years (and we've been gaming together from the beginning) is a very skilled player and, better, her skillset meshes well with mine. We're both "whole-engagement" thinkers, approach tactical and strategic elements synergistically, but go about it in slightly different ways. In some games she excels in a tank role, in others as a healer, same of me (vice versa).

This gets really fun on our alts: she'll play a class I wrote the book on, I'll play a class she knows inside and out. We'll wind up doing some teaching, allowing some space for discovery, and each of us finding new subtleties and nuances of play. This "game as communication" play works well with our already gab-heavy relationship. To the "advanced play" couple, I heartily recommend playing a class/role that your significant other has mastered (and that they do the same).

For the advanced couple (level 70 spouses) that's new to playing as a couple, a few suggestions to add to the solid list in the article:

-Even if you and your partner are married, neither of you are married to your character. If you're both new or new-ish you may have chosen a class combination that doesn't work well, or characters that don't work well for your individual playstyles. Even if you've gamed together before, a new game might require a new approach. When we started WoW I rolled a "nuker" and she rolled a "tank", the roles we'd always played before. It took a few rerolls before we really settled into my tank and her healer. When it "clicks", it REALLY clicks, and don't be afraid to tinker and give things a test drive before blazing forward.

-Be clear about your goals as a team. If one person wants to keep it chill, explore, craft, and the other one is a frenzied raid addict, that needs to be understood and worked around. Different overall goals doesn't mean it can't work, just that you'll need to plan for Your Time, My Time, and Our Time (and be careful not to get them confused). If you DO have similar goals, so much the better.

Posted: Dec 10th 2007 5:28PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I admit to being a Power Gamer myself, as growing up it was always my goal in any game to beat it. Only when I delved into the world of RPG's starting with Final Fantasy VII and Pokemon in the late 90's did I really start to realize that some games are meant to explore and do many other things besides just getting to the end.

My ex-girlfriend was the one to introduce me to the terrible world of Blizzard games starting with Starcraft, which consumed most of our duo-gaming back then, to be later claimed by Ragnarok Online. World of Warcraft came after we broke up a year and a half ago, a game which I initially swore off because the guy she more or less cheated on me for played it, often using my computer which I had nothing but contempt for. Another good friend of mine however convinced me to play and sure enough I started playing and after a few hiatuses I have a 70 Rogue Horde-side.

I got my current girlfriend into playing WoW with me, but admitingly after farming or grinding on my main, I often don't want to play my alts, which is why we can never play with just us. At some point I want to correct this, but since she doesn't play that much because of work, I still end up playing mostly by myself anyway.

Posted: Dec 13th 2007 1:20PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
This is very true for my wife and myself. We actually met online in Second Life, and later married in Reality. We have been playing WoW together for over a year (she's played for about two years and introduced me to it) and we've seen a number of these symptoms. She's been jealous at times because I surpassed her in leveling, because I was able to spend more time playing due to the nature of my job; we've quested together and separately, and there have been times when I devoted myself to trying to help her level. The thing is, she's really a far superior player to me, because I have spent nearly twice as long actually playing my character than she has, and yet currently I'm a 60 and she's a 56. The key is, all things in moderation.

P2

Featured Stories

Betawatch: April 12 - 18, 2014

Posted on Apr 18th 2014 8:00PM

Hands-on with Windborne's early access

Posted on Apr 18th 2014 5:00PM

Engadget

Engadget

Joystiq

Joystiq

WoW Insider

WoW

TUAW

TUAW